PhotosynQ Focus: Rodrigo Gomez

Focusing on how the community is using PhotosynQ technologies. This month we are highlighting Rodrigo Gomez, a researcher at the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology of Rosario in Argentina who leads the way in macro and protocol creation on the PhotosynQ platform.

 

Dr. Rodrigo Gomez is one of the earliest adopters of PhotosynQ, becoming involved during the MultispeQ beta days. Beyond being an early adopter, Dr. Gomez has taken full advantage of PhotosynQ’s flexibility. Not satisfied with the default measurement protocols offered for the MultispeQ, Dr. Gomez would teach himself Javascript and become one of the most prolific creators of protocols and macro’s on the PhotosynQ platform.

 

Dr. Gomez first became interested in plant biology while attending high school in Argentina’s third largest city, Rosario, when his teacher assigned him a project on photosynthesis, and from there his interest would grow. This interest led to his earning his Ph.D in Biological Science in the Centre of Studies on Photosynthesis and Biochemistry at the National University of Rosario.

 

Eventually Dr. Gomez found himself working for the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology of Rosario (IBR) under the direction of Dr.  Néstor Carrillo, who just so happened to be his Molecular Biology professor during college. Dr. Carrillo’s lab is focused on the study of stress biology in plants and the creation of biotechnology tools to make plants more resistance to such stress. Dr. Gomez’s role in the lab is to construct transgenic tobacco plants that express flavodiiron proteins (Flvs) from cyanobacteria. The aim of the project is to increase plant stress tolerance to high and fluctuating light, and other sources of abiotic stress.

 

Dr. Gomez first heard about PhotosynQ from a colleague of his. They were discussing the difficulty they were having measuring chlorophyll fluorescence with their old and outdated equipment. His colleague, another early PhotosynQ’er Alavaro Quijano, told Dr. Gomez that he had read about a very affordable fluorometer, recently released, and that he bought it; it was the MultispeQ beta. As soon as Alavaro got it, Rodrigo started using it, but he wanted to conduct very specific types of measurements, beyond what we offered at the time.  Dr. Gomez explains, “I started creating my own protocols using the PhotosynQ tutorials and basically copying and editing staff protocols. But I couldn’t do it without the great help that Greg Austic gave me.”  After that, he started learning how to code using Javascript so that he could create his own protocol’s and macro’s. Dr. Gomez would go on to be PhotosynQ’s number one creator of protocols and macros.

 

Since Dr. Gomez became involved with the PhotosynQ project early he has seen “all the changes of the devices and the platform over the years.” Dr. Gomez says that he came a big fan of PhotosynQ. In his most recently published manuscript all of the measurements were taken using PhotosynQ. More importantly, having access to PhotosynQ’s open, affordable and flexible tools has helped him find his research field in science. He explained to us that “now I certainly know that I want to continue working in photosynthesis, so I can say that the discovery of MultispeQ/PhotosynQ was decisive for me”.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.